About Giving Tuesday

#GivingTuesday is a global giving movement with local impact.

Founded by the team in the Belfer Center for Innovation & Social Impact, #GivingTuesday is a global giving movement being celebrated in more than 190 countries across the globe, and 100 local community campaigns in the US. #GivingTuesday harnesses the collective power of a unique blend of partners to transform how people think about, talk about, and participate in the giving season. It inspires people to take collective action to improve their communities, give back in better, smarter ways to the charities and causes they believe in, and help create a better world. #GivingTuesday demonstrates how every act of generosity counts, and that they mean even more when we give together.

https://www.givingtuesday.org/about

Giving Tuesday and LIFE

You can take this opportunity, as people across the globe celebrate the freedom to give, to contribute to something that you know and trust. The people of LIFE UMC take pride in our heritage of being difference makers in the Fairmont area for over a century, and you can keep the ball rolling with your own generosity.

  • We stand in the gap for the marginalized, the forgotten, and the neglected. 
  • LIFE meets the needs of our communities by collecting food for pantries.
  • The Backpack Ministry feeds hungry students when they go home for the weekend.
  • LIFE provides ministry opportunities, worship experiences, and Christian education for the clients at Fairmont’s Disability Action Center
  • LIFE supports Fairmont’s Union Mission and West Virginia Rescue Ministries.
  • Members of our congregation collect medical supplies and travel to Honduras to provide health care.
  • The LIFE UM Men regularly donate to various local charities.

These are just a few of the ways that you make a difference in Fairmont when you give to LIFE. Download our App or click on Online Giving to make a contribution.

The United Methodist Church and Apportioned Funds

LIFE is a United Methodist Church. The main way we support the ministries of the church is through our apportioned funds, a method of giving that proportionally allocates the churchwide budget to conferences and local churches.

For United Methodists this method of giving has become a strong, generous tradition.

Together, through our connected congregations, we accomplish what no single church, district or annual conference ever could hope to do alone. In this way, each individual, each family, each congregation gives a fair share for the church’s work. We combine our prayers, presence, gifts and service to make a significant difference in the lives of God’s people.

For more information about Apportioned Funds click the link below.

http://www.umc.org/how-we-serve/apportioned-funds

Change of Date

“Ferdinand” will be shown on Saturday, August 24th at 7pm.
*The date change is in order to provide a Memorial Service and Celebration of Life for Dr. Ian Leggat on Friday, August 23rd, 6pm.

LIFE UMC Heads “Into the Spider-Verse” on Aug. 16

This week Tag Team Movie Reviewers Nicholas Angelo and Amy Baker give you the scoop on the next movie in the LIFE UMC “At the Movies” series. You can watch “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” rated PG, starring the voice talent of Shameik Moore, Jake Johnson, Hailee Steinfeld, Lily Tomlin, Zoe Kravitz, John Mulaney, Nicolas Cage, Liev Schreiber, Chris Pine and many more at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, at the church. Admission is free and open to the public. There will be popcorn!

AMY: I have to be honest here, Nicholas. I haven’t seen a Spider-Man movie since he was played by Tobey McGuire. You’re going to have to lead us through this action-packed animated adventure. Wonder Woman is my favorite superhero.

NICHOLAS: I don’t have a favorite superhero. I do like Spider-Man but don’t consider myself an expert. The really dedicated Spider-Man fans call McGuire the nerdy Spider-Man. The next one was Andrew Garfield, and he probably wasn’t the best one. Then came Tom Holland, who I think is the best so far. He has been in “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Spider-Man: Far from Home,” as well as “Captain America: Civil War.” He is part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

AMY: How does “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” compare to the other Spidey flicks?

NICHOLAS: It’s actually way different. It’s like a cartoonish version of the movies. There is a completely different kid named Miles Morales, voiced by Shameik Moore, who becomes “Spider-Man.” He accidentally sees the real webbed wonder get killed and then is bitten by a radioactive spider himself. Two villains, Kingpin and Doc Oc, create a weapon that brings other versions of “Spider-Man” from different dimensions to Miles’ dimension and they unite to set everything right.

AMY: I’m a fan of the show “New Girl,” so I liked that Jake Johnson voices the divorced, slightly out-of-shape Spider-Man. Then there’s Spider-Gwen and Peni Parker, two Spider-Women.

NICHOLAS: And don’t forget Spider-Ham who is a cartoon pig. I didn’t get the pig. Its eyes were on its snout on one scene. I was so confused. Spider-Man Noir was pretty cool, though.

AMY: Are these other spider heroes based on real comics?

NICHOLAS: Yes, they are actually part of comic books by Marvel Comics. I have to say I didn’t like “Into the Spider-Verse” too much. I like my traditional, live-action “Spider-Man.” The cartoonish version is just OK. If you’re looking for a fun way to spend some family time, though, this movie would be good for you.

AMY: So, what was your favorite part of the movie?

NICHOLAS: There was a funny scene where all the Spider-Men were fighting inside Aunt May’s house, and she was kicking them out for breaking all her stuff.

AMY: Seriously. I would never be Mary Jane and date a superhero because I have way too many breakables.

NICHOLAS: The movie is a little sad, too. All the versions of Spider-Man have lost someone they love. Miles loses his uncle. In other universes, Uncle Ben died or Aunt May died. Nobody died for Tom Holland, except his parents. Even Kingpin is kind of sad because his real motive is to get a version of his family back.

AMY: In Miles’ universe, Spider-Man had a secret shed of cool suits and gadgets and vehicles. What was up with that?

NICHOLAS: Yes, the other versions of Spider-Man were definitely jealous of all that gear. It was more like a Batman kind of thing. I will say that the suit Miles created for himself with spray paint is significant. True fans will get it.

AMY: My favorite part was recognizing the celebrity voices, like Nicolas Cage who was Spider-Noir.

NICHOLAS: I didn’t recognize any voices I really knew. Something tells me I knew the pig’s voice. Maybe not.

AMY: Well, not to say too much, but you can probably guess how the movie ends. 

NICHOLAS: Be careful, Amy, Marvel has a spoiler ban. And you are now assigned homework. You need to watch all the Spider-Man movies you’ve missed since Tobey McGuire. You won’t be sorry. 

AMY: OK, Nicholas. I’ll accept that mission, but it will have to wait a bit. Next week we’ll be talking about “Ferdinand,” which will be shown at the church at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23.

LIFE UMC At the Movies Again! This time with The Greatest Showman.

This week Tag Team Movie Reviewers Nicholas Angelo and Amy Baker give you the scoop on the next movie in the LIFE UMC “At the Movies” series. You can watch “The Greatest Showman,” rated PG, starring Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron, Zendaya and Michelle Williams at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10, at the church. Admission is free and open to the public. There will be popcorn!

AMY: Come one, come all! Welcome to this Big Top edition of LIFE UMC “At the Movies”! You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll eat popcorn! You might even sing. Nicholas, do you like musicals?

NICHOLAS: I’ve only really seen three: “High School Musical,” “Beauty and the Beast” and now “The Greatest Showman.” I can honestly say it’s the best musical I’ve ever seen! I really liked the soundtrack.

AMY: Inspired by the real-life showman P.T. Barnum, this original musical tells the story of a dreamer who creates a new genre of entertainment, the circus, with the help of some unique people who had been excluded from society. Throughout the movie, Hugh Jackman as Barnum struggles with the balance of fulfilling his vision and remembering what matters most – his true friends; his wife Charity, played by Michelle Williams; and their children.

NICHOLAS: I enjoyed the history part of the story. There was a lot of stuff in there from the 1800s time period. I recognized Zendaya from “Spiderman” and Zac Efron from “High School Musical.” 

AMY: Efron plays Phillip, Barnum’s partner/apprentice who falls in love with a trapeze artist named Anne, played by Zendaya. Nicholas, last time you said you weren’t a fan of movie romance. What did you think about that in this movie?

NICHOLAS: For this movie, the love stuff didn’t bother me. It made sense as part of Barnum’s life story and what he was going through. 

AMY: I know what you mean. Barnum, who grew up as the poor son of a tailor, gets so focused on rising in society that he makes some questionable choices and forgets about those who helped him get to where he was. 

NICHOLAS: And those were the people he helped step from out of the shadows into the light, like the “Bearded Lady,” “Dog Boy,” “Irish Giant” and “Tom Thumb.” My favorite song was “This Is Me,” that they sang in protest because they weren’t invited to a fancy party. Society viewed them as sideshow oddities, but Barnum saw them as unique and talented – and then turned his back on them.

AMY: Enter singer Jenny Lind, a performer even the elite society would come out to see. Barnum risks it all – his fortune and his family – to try to live his dream of being accepted. Then disaster strikes.

NICHOLAS: It takes losing everything to bring Barnum back to his real purpose and remember what is most important. He loses his building but comes up with the creative circus tent idea. And – Spoiler Alert – Barnum ends up stepping back and letting his apprentice take over so he can spend more time with his family.

AMY: Barnum spends the whole movie trying to create a better life for his wife, the life they dreamed of as children. A better life for Charity, though, isn’t really money and fame.

NICHOLAS: If you want to make somebody happy, it’s really in the little things. You don’t have to ride in on an elephant to show you care.

AMY: Great insights, Nicholas! Next week we’ll be talking about “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” which will be shown at the church at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16.

LIFE UMC “At the Movies” Full of “Wonder” and Plenty of Popcorn

This week Tag Team Movie Reviewers Nicholas Angelo and Amy Baker give you the scoop on the first movie in the LIFE UMC “At the Movies” series. You can catch “Wonder,” rated PG, starring Julia Roberts, Owen Wilson and some great younger actors at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, at the church. Admission is free and open to the public. There will be popcorn!

AMY: Hey, Nicholas, what do you like about movies?

NICHOLAS: I like the action parts and all the craziness.

AMY: I like the popcorn! And sometimes I venture into the other food group, nachos.

NICHOLAS: I thought it was really cool when I heard we could all watch movies together at church. Lots of people came last year. Bill Barnes brought his whole neighborhood.

AMY: I’m excited about it, too. Again, mostly about the popcorn. What kind of movies do you normally enjoy?

NICHOLAS: “Spiderman: Far from Home” is my favorite movie. My family is watching “Spiderman: Homecoming” tonight. We’re getting into the whole Marvel Avengers thing. We watch movies as a family most of the time. I like action movies, no romance and all that stuff. There’s a little bit of that in “Spiderman,” but not enough to make it boring.

AMY: I like a good romance movie, but I like action movies, too. I also really like scary movies, but I can only watch them in the middle of the day or I won’t sleep.

NICHOLAS: “Jurassic Park” was scary enough for me.

AMY: We don’t have to worry about being scared by the movies at LIFE. The first movie we’re watching this summer is “Wonder,” the inspiring story of August “Auggie” Pullman, a boy with facial differences who has been homeschooled all his life, and his experience entering fifth grade at a prep school. I’ve only seen half of the movie, so you need to tell me how it ends and if you recommend it.

NICHOLAS: No spoilers, Amy! I can’t tell our readers how it ends, but I do recommend it; it’s a good movie. It really tells you how a kid like Auggie gets through the world and makes friends.

AMY: From what I saw, the whole premise of this movie is to “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” What I like about “Wonder” is that you see the story from the perspectives of different characters. When your friend hurts your feelings, you don’t always know why and what internal struggle your friend is facing. “Wonder” lets you hear a character’s thoughts and understand. It’s a touching story about courage, forgiveness, friendship and family. 

NICHOLAS: For younger kids, we recommend “Shrek,” which will also be shown at the church. It’s been a while since I watched “Shrek,” but I don’t really remember a lesson to that movie. I know it’s a fairy tale about a big green ogre and a princess.

AMY: Hmm. I think there is a lesson in “Shrek” that’s very similar to the one in “Wonder.” Both movies are about how someone looks and how that causes people to be scared of him and the character to be lonely. 

NICHOLAS: Oh yeah, and in both movies the main character realizes how much he needs friends. (Small word of advice, there is some adult humor in “Shrek,” rated PG, but a lot of it will be over the heads of smaller kids. And let’s face it, you’ve probably seen it already anyway.)

AMY: So, Nicholas, I think our movie conversation went really well. Thanks so much for hanging out with me.

NICHOLAS: You’re welcome. I think it went well, too.

AMY: So, we’ll make this the first of a whole series of Tag Team Movie Reviews for this summer?

NICHOLAS: Cool! See you next week!

AMY: See you then. Next week we’ll be talking about “The Greatest Showman,” which will be shown at the church at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10.

Online Giving Update!

On Sunday, August 25th, Pastor Larry’s sermon is about Extravagant Generosity. During this time we will celebrate the gifts and offerings that LIFE UMC has received from you, and talk about ways that everyone can continue to support the ministry and missions of LIFE as we continue to grow into the future. You will also hear about some changes that we will be making very soon to our online giving experience.

To make it easier more secure for everyone to offer their financial gifts, LIFE will be adopting a new giving platform that will coincide with some new communications tools that will be rolling out in stages over the next several months. We want this transition to be as smooth and easy as possible for you. If you are already giving to LIFE on a recurring basis through our website or mobile app, you will be contacted soon so that we can assist you with that transition.

Old Online Giving

Our old giving platform will be available until we have been assured that everyone has made the transition. You can continue to access Online Giving as you have in the past from HERE.

New Giving Platform

Though we have yet to begin to help you transition form our old giving option, the New Giving Platform is ready to use! Give it a try HERE!